Welcome to the first release of The Daily Immersive! Click Here For The Press Release

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Rate My Professors: Barry Edition
By: Brianna Lopez - 2019-03-28 10:07:46

Barry University houses majors ranging from nursing to sports management, all featuring professors who have different qualities to bring to the teaching table. These qualities consist of being fast-paced or manageable, being willing to help students in or outside of class, being attentive, being professional and respectable. Barry students admit that some professors simply weren’t as likeable as others.  

 When asked about who their favorites and not-so favorites were, students gave The Buccaneer the inside scoop. 

 

Favorite Management Professor  

“My favorite professor and class would have to be David Bone, SMB 250. His teaching style is very easy and relatable toward the stuff that we learn today. There are many topics in Sports Management that are unfamiliar to us and it’s easy for us to relate to some of these topics when he gives us some real-life examples for us to understand, rather than reading out of the textbook 24/7.”  

– Jimmy Muniz Jr., Freshman, Sports Management major 

 

Least Favorite English Professor 

Speaking about his less-than-perfect Professor Vanessa Fardin, teacher of English 111, this was what a Barry first-year student had to say. 

“We usually come to class and we really don’t do anything. She just comes to class, tells us what we have to do for the week, and just tells us to do it on our own. The only thing she’ll do to teach is just read the PowerPoint and expect us to understand it like that.” 

-Aaron Sandy-Hewitt, Freshman, Finance major  

 

Favorite Statistics Professor 

“My favorite professor is probably Professor Ricardo Sanchez; he teaches statistics. Why? Because he teaches for the test and that helps a lot. He’s a good teacher, he makes sure you know the information, and he’s real with you.”  

-Freshman Seanon May, Undecided 

 

Least Favorite Mathematics Professor 

“My least favorite professor is Professor De La Cruz. I have him for math, statistics, and I don’t want to be mean, but he has an accent. It’s just hard sometimes to understand what he’s saying.” 

-Ashley Fernandez, Freshman, Pre-Nursing major 

 

Least Favorite Speech Professor 

The dreaded speech class was bound to come up, and it did when freshman Mervin Medina began criticizing his professor J.R. Steele, or as they call her, Coach Steele.  

 

“Coach Steele, who teaches Speech, is my least favorite. Because as much as she tries to coach us, she doesn’t understand what it’s like to be taught in the way that she teaches. She expects us to know how to speak after our first speech, and she doesn’t put herself in our shoes.”  

-Mervin Medina, Freshman, Sports Management major 

 

On the other hand, freshman Kiahnaliss Ventura told The Buccaneer the opposite. 

 “She’s exactly like a coach. She guides you step by step and pushes you when you need a lift. She’s not even like a teacher in the class; she makes us feel like she’s one of us.” 

-Kiahnaliss Ventura, Freshman Pre-Nursing major 

 

Favorite Law Professor 

Sophomore Kechelle Robinson expressed her love for the teaching style of Dr. Jillian Rivard, professor of law and psychology. 

 

“She’s very energetic in class even though the topics we have to cover are hard to talk about. She always comes prepared with exercises and different ways to help the students understand the new material and she really makes an effort to help everyone in the class succeed.” 

-Kechelle Robinson, Sophomore, Psychology major 

  

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Sister Linda Retiring — Barry Students will miss her at usual watering holes
By: Maria Manzanares - 2019-03-28 09:41:39

You see her at BUC Stop, at basketball games and just about everywhere on campus. She is the headmaster, the boss lady, the one who runs the school. She is always ready to say hello with a wave and a smile on her face. Everyone has seen her at least once — our President Sister Linda Bevilacqua. 

But, as of next school year, we will no longer be seeing her as regularly because she will be retiring from her post as school president. 

Sister Linda Bevilacqua was born on March 7, 1941.  She studied in Long Island and at Mary Louis Academy in Jamaica, New York. She graduated from Barry University in 1962 and soon after entered the congregation of the Dominican Sisters of Adrian, Michigan.  

Afterwards, she returned to Barry in 1969 to become the assistant dean for the then-president sister Helen Duggan. From 1970 to 1978, she was dean of students at Barry.  

Before becoming president of Barry, she was president of Gwynedd Mercy College in Pennsylvania.  

Since 2004, Sister Linda Bevilacqua has been the president of her Alma Mater, making her the sixth president but the first alumna president. She has since been guiding and transforming the school into an urban, multi-cultural, and multi-ethnic university. 

She has made an impact with students and faculty alike. 

“Sister Linda has an extensive history with our university and has served as a guiding force for Barry’s positive transformation over the years, so it is bittersweet to see her go,” said Britania Cameron, sophomore philosophy major and minoring in political science.   

One of the biggest and first changes she made was when she was dean of students was removing the dress code in 1970. Before then, Barry students were only allowed to wear skirts and blouses due to the fact it was an all-women school prior to the 1970s. 

Sister Linda has also been at the helm of erecting new buildings around campus. She oversaw the construction of administrative offices for the School of Podiatric Medicine, four other law school facilities and the signature Sylvester Tower, which was constructed in 2006. 

She will be retiring from her presidency at the end of this school year, yet students will miss spotting her at her usual spots.   

“Sister Linda is always present on campus and while I personally do not talk to her a lot, I always see her at the cafeteria eating or around campus and she’s always saying hi to the students and fellow faculty members,” said Edgar Marcano, junior and forensic psychology major.  

Barry students don’t know what to expect from the new president, but they know some qualities they’d like the person have.  

Felix Vega-Pagan, a criminology student, said that he hopes “our next president is a male, we need more male representation...someone who’s a representation of the student body.” 

Throughout the history of Barry as an institution, we’ve only had women-sister presidents to complement our original all-female school.  

Cameron adds that she expects the new president will play an integral role in the developing Barry as “an urban and multicultural university, while upholding our core commitments.”  

Faculty members have different expectations of the new president and they pertain to making Barry more financially stable. 

“I hope the next president is someone who’s good at fundraising, more of a people person and will continue to help grow the school out further,” said Professor Vladimir Lescouflair. 

But will the new president also be a clergy member or will Barry go more modern by taking on a layperson as president? 

 “It doesn’t matter if the next president is a nun or not, as long as they do a good job and keep expanding the university,” said Marcano. 

Many people say they won’t be surprised if it is another nun or a member of the church, but most don’t have a preference.  

Sister Linda told The Buccaneer she is not quite ready to be interviewed about her leaving/retiring from the presidency at Barry University. However, she will offer the newspaper an interview in the spring semester. 

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Flavor, Spice and Everything Nice Miami’s unique Latino food scene is a plus for Barry sudents
By: Maura Padron - 2019-03-28 09:38:57

If there is one thing that Miami prides itself on is the beautiful mix of cultures that reside within the city limits. It’s a place where Latinos have made their very colorful mark on society. The language, traditions and family-like atmosphere can be seen from Miami Beach all the way to Calle Ocho.  

One of the strongest Latin influences the city has to share is its cuisine. Delicious Latin American dishes and distinct ingredients that keep the culture alive can be found on every street corner. Many of these restaurants take the natural spices from their home countries and give it back to the people of Miami with a special twist. It’s particularly special for students coming to Miami to study because it gives them unique flavors to try for affordable prices.  

 

Graziano’s  

This is a traditional Argentinian restaurant that has been serving up juicy, flame-grilled steaks since 1962 when Mario and Maria Graziano first came to America. It has become a renowned franchise here in South Florida with locations approximately 20 minutes away from Barry University by car. The two closest locations are in Hialeah and Coral Gables. They offer a place to eat traditional Argentinian dishes such as steak, empanadas and alfajores pastries. A few of their locations even have adjoining markets that promote Argentinian ingredients, meat cuts and an extensive wine selection. So, whether you’re in the mood to eat out or just want to pick up some supplies before inviting friends over for an asado, then Graziano’s is definitely an option to keep in mind.  

 

Vicky´s Bakery 

You can’t drive through any part of Miami without seeing a Vicky´s Bakery sign. This original Miami treasure started in Hialeah in 1972 and has more than 20 locations all over the city. The closest locations are in Hialeah and in North Miami Beach. Both of them are within 15 minutes from Barry University. The magic behind these delicious pastries, pastelitos, and café Cubanos is they were handed down from first generation Cuban immigrants who strive to keep their traditional foods alive. These sweet treats are perfect for on-the-go moments or to share with a group. An all-night study session is hardly complete without un café Cubano to keep you going.  


La Granja  

La Granja is not only a classic Miami restaurant, but also a staple across the state of Florida. This Peruvian restaurant was actually first established in Aruba in 1993, and it wasn’t until a few years later that the first Miami La Granja location was opened. This restaurant has been such a huge success that in 2007 they opened their business to franchise opportunities. They offer really great portion sizes of the most popular Peruvian dishes, such as ceviche and lomo salteado for really great pricing options. Whenever the craving hits for a warm and filling plate, La Granja is always one to keep in mind. You can find the closest one on 36th Street. It shouldn’t be more than a 10-minute drive from campus. So, whenever the craving hits for a warm and filling plate, La Granja is always one to keep in mind. 

Doggis  

This is a Venezuelan restaurant that has made waves in the Latin culinary industry in the last few years. What started out as a hot dog stand in 2010 in Coral Gables has transformed into a very popular restaurant. The Venezuelan community is unsurprisingly large in Miami,  and many Venezuelans are constantly looking for a place that serves arepas and cachapas like they do in their country. Fortunately, for them, Doggis is known for having some of the most authentic Venezuelan recipes. There are four locations in Miami, the nearest one to Barry University is on Biscayne Boulevard. Recently, it is becoming even more popular among the younger citizens of Miami with their participation in local foodie events such as the Hungry Post Blurry Brunches and South Beach Wine and Food Festival. And if you ever find yourself in Wynwood on a night out, they even have a food truck parked on Northwest Second Avenue that you can check out with your friends! 

 

Texas de Brazil 

Sometimes there is nothing wrong with splurging a little on a fancy dinner and there are restaurants that promise to give you what your money is worth. Texas de Brazil is one of those places where your time spent there is worth every cent. Texas de Brazil opened their first restaurant in Texas because of the rancher lifestyle that is similar to the Brazilian ranchos. That connection led the founders to set up shop and bring their “parade of meats” to the U.S. Their success shot their brand to different areas in the country, which include Miami. The pricing is a bit higher, but the continuous procession of meats and side dishes is definitely worth it. There are nine locations spread around Florida, but there are two locations relatively close to campus. Head over to Alton Road to enjoy the food and maybe walk around the popular shopping area on a day away from your studies. 

 

Eating in Miami is an amazing experience. There are tons of options to choose from and it’s not a requirement to break into your piggy banks to enjoy it. The cultural scene in the city is truly unique. Immersing yourself in the Latino environment during your time studying in Miami is a must. These are just a few restaurants that promise authenticity and great food quality. So, go out and take advantage of all this city has to offer. Buen provecho!  

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Barry University’s Proud Team of Warriors
By: Estefania Rodriguez - 2019-03-28 09:33:50

Barry women’s soccer team is now the Sunshine State Conference Champions. 

 Twenty-five magnificent women from all around the world came together to make Barry University a respected name in women’s soccer. 

 For more than three decades, Barry University has had a women’s soccer team, bringing home three national championships: 1989, 1992, and 1993.  

 This 2018 season, our warriors have won 17 out of their 18 games, winning by outstanding differences of 6-0, 5-0, and 4-0. 

 “We have never been more prepared,” said Coach Sarah Dacey, stating they are are the greatest team she has coached at Barry. 

 Coach Dacey joined the women's soccer coaching staff as an assistant coach for the 2015 season. She helped lead the team to a Sunshine State Conference regular season and tournament championships as well as the NCAA Division II South Region title.  

 With a roster full of promising players and nine seniors on the team, Dacey feels that the reason they have gotten so far, aside from the hard work the entire team has done and their talent, is those nine seniors—Jade Adams, Antonella Monrreal, Molly Sharpe, Alyssa Lugo, Christy Grimshaw, Alissa Bello, Malanie Ziegner, Ingrid Lian, and Brittany Larosa. They have played together since their freshman year and their knowledge will be passed up and coming teammates. 

 Assistant Coach Nick Jaramillo, Keeper Coach Brian Galvin, and Volunteer Assistant Coach Natalie Moik are also responsible for leading the team this far. 

 The huge chemistry between the players both on the field and off the field is well perceived. 

 Brittany Larosa, an exercise psychology major, was shifted into the defensive third last season, where she made an immediate impact. She has held the same quickness and energy during the entire season, earning a place in the Sunshine State Conference Commissioner's Honor Roll this fall. 

Management major Yanny Asson from Couva, Trinidad plays in the defensive line and is known for her athleticism and technical ability to her game. 

 “We are actually taking it pretty seriously,” she said.  

 Christy Grimshaw is called “the engine of the team.” A double major in business and marketing, she is one of the team’s most valuable players. The Scottish phenomenon has score 17 goals and tallied more than nine assists this season, making her way through repeating Player of the Year two years in a row 2017-2018 

 Not only did the team win the title for Conference or the award for Best Player of the Year, but they received 11 All-SSC awards including Offensive Player of the Year, Molly Sharpe; Defensive Player of the Year, Jade Adams; and Coach of the Year, Coach Sarah Dacey. 

 “Their leadership has been outstanding,” said Dacey, referring to the seniors who will be retiring this season. 

 

 

 

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Bringing augmented and virtual reality to the classroom on a budget
By: by Matt Ramirez (@Jisc_AR) - 2019-02-04 07:01:39

It’s easy to think that augmented and virtual reality (AR and VR) are only for organizations with hefty budgets and cash to splash.

It’s true that a top-of-the-range piece of tech, such as the Microsoft HoloLens, is certainly impressive and could set you back thousands of pounds. However, there are opportunities for organisations on a budget, such as colleges, to take advantage of immersive edtech without breaking the bank.  

Using what you already have

Last year, I was put in touch with Preston's College, and set the task of arming it with some budget-level, but still impressive edtech.

I took along the HTC Vive (a VR system), and demonstrated a virtual reality version of a futuristic Bodleian library. I also showed off a Structure Sensor, which can scan objects and load them into a repository like Moodle, so they can be displayed as 3D objects.

We also discussed other 3D and VR software that might suit the college, and how existing resources and technology could be used to best enhance teaching, rather than forking out for expensive new kit. This approach will save a fair amount of money in the long run. The team invested in some 3D cameras, and I left feeling excited to see what they might produce.

Putting skeletons online

I returned to Preston's College to attend an e-learning day and was incredibly impressed with what I saw. Old anatomical models that had previously been gathering dust had been scanned into the virtual learning environment (VLE). These can now be accessed online by students, wherever they are.

The models had even been made interactive, so they’re not only excellent for flexible learning, but are immersive and engaging, too.

Watching back drama assessments in 360

Practical music performance assessments were recorded in 360 VR, allowing invigilators to annotate the recordings and pinpoint moments that needed feedback or praise.

Students can now review their assessments in an immersive way

Students can now review their assessments in an immersive way, while linking feedback to their performance, allowing them to improve more rapidly.

Creating VR environments

VR can help organise and plan learning spaces too, and I worked with the college to design a new learning space for a dormant room, using virtual reality.

This sort of technology really helps the designer to see what the new space might look like, allowing furniture and teaching paraphernalia to be placed in a way that works for everyone who might use the space. It also allows students to experience the learning space and to make sure it is appropriate for their use.

Why should we integrate edtech?

The feedback from staff and students at Preston's College when it came to these new technologies was truly great – they were full of energy and appreciative of what the new tech could help everyone to achieve.

Today’s students will probably be using technology that is just emerging now when they start their first jobs

Today’s students will probably be using technology that is just emerging now when they start their first jobs after graduating from college or university, so it’s important that they get to grips with it now.

While VR and AR can sometimes be seen as futuristic, they’re actually very much of the moment and are already being used to train surgeons, for example. The initial cost of a VRcamera might seem daunting, but take a look around you, I bet there’s so much you could do with one to enhance the learning experience for students and staff alike.

Get in touch with Matt (matt.ramirez@jisc.ac.uk) if you’d like advice on what your college could do with AR and VR.

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Barry's Diary of International Students
By: Maura Padron - 2018-11-29 04:55:15

He grew up watching cowboy movies and listening to Michael Jackson songs, yet he is from a country located thousands of miles away from here. Naif Saeed was born in Saudi Arabia, and as many other citizens of his country, he chose to study in the United States to be exposed to the American culture he loved so much. 

  

A finance major, one of his many goals since arriving in Miami has been to share with Americans the values of his homeland —values like honor, honesty and respect. 

 

According to the Migration Policy Institute, the United States has historically been the top destination for international students due to its excellence in higher education, popular culture and labor market. 

  

Today, it remains the country of choice for the largest number of international students, welcoming about 1.1 million in 2017. Barry was, in fact, rated the No.6 college campus for diversity according to the Office of Institutional Research. 

 

Most of them come to Barry from Saudi Arabia, Spain, Bahamas, Venezuela and Brazil, reported the Office of Multicultural Involvement. 

 

¨The most valuable thing I learned here is perseverance and to never ignore or overestimate a small idea, because sooner or later, it can come true," said Saeed, who hopes to one day build his own business empire to benefit youth.  

 

Thinking of big business, international education is the fifth-largest service of export, according to Allan Goodman with the U.S. department of commerce. These students contribute more than $30 billion a year to the U.S. economy.  

 

Ander Urkidi was only a child in the city of Bilbao, Spain when he listened to his grandfather tell stories about living in Miami. At that age, he never imagined that his future awaited him in the sunshine metropolis. 

 

Urkidi is the oldest of three siblings and, as a good Spanish native, he was playing with a soccer ball even before walking. Urkidi´s childhood dream was to play for the national team one day - a dream that he woke up from in his adolescence. Spain limited Urkidi´s professional options, so he chose collegiate studies instead. 

 

¨In Miami, I had the attractive opportunity to combine my passion for soccer with an upper level education as well as receive the economic support of a scholarship,” said Urkidi, who has played as a striker for Barry men’s soccer since he arrived in 2016. 

 

He \made international business his major - just like his grandfather. As many foreign students do, he struggled with the language. He argues that, in Spain, there is not enough emphasis placed on acquiring a high level of English competency. 

 

¨In Miami, you have the advantage to feel more at home with those who speak the same language as you. But, you also have the benefit and responsibility to improve your skills with local speakers," said Urkidi.  

 

Micaela Cordone also started her journey at Barry in 2016.  She felt mixed emotions while looking out of the airplane window, leaving her home of Uruguay behind.  

 

She was born and raised in Punta del Este, a small city in the Charrúa land of Uruguay and from an early age, her parents infused values in her that would make her stand out later in life.  

 

After finishing high school with outstanding grades, Cordone moved to the capital of her country, Monte Video.  Uruguay’s most respectable universities are located only in the capital, so she had to move there to further her education. She started at the best college of the country, yet she felt like a fish out of water.  

 

It was then that the Uruguayan decided to follow her instinct. She started at Barry with a bag full of dreams and a head full of aspirations.    

 

“American schools have more learning resources,” she said. “You have the freedom to choose electives and be more creative doing your schedule. In Uruguay, we do not have that luxury, sadly we have less options that end up limiting our potential.”  

 

 At Barry, there were – however - many obstacles such as language differences, cultural disparities and employment.  

 

¨When companies know you are from abroad, they assume you are not going to stay because of the visa conditions. On the other hand, doing internships is helpful,” she said. “Performance is the best guarantee we have for future job opportunities." 

 

Still, she worked to overcome these barriers. Today, as a junior studying international business, she has made the dean´s list and has internship proposals for next semester.  

 

“As an international student, I have an enormous amount of commitment and responsibility to succeed. Because I recall all the effort and strength my parents and I have done to put me in the position where I am today. To me, success is the best way to show them appreciation,¨ said Cordone.  

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Fine Arts Student Highlight: English Major Jonathan Gonzalez and His Love for Music
By: Johania Charles - 2018-11-29 04:48:37

Jonathan Gonzalez, born and raised in Miami to Nicaraguan parents, believes that he’s always had some sort of connection to music as confirmed by his mother who would have dreams of him singing while being pregnant with him.  

His passion for music began at a very young age and even led him to begin singing at church. 

Once he entered Barry, he took private voice classes with Dr. Giselle Rios, associate professor of music, where he learned proper technique and how to find his voice.  

What started out as voice lessons flourished into a love for the creative arts. He is now a senior majoring in English with a professional writing specialization and a music minor.  

“Music and art in general are therapeutic…it has always helped me deal with difficult situations," said Gonzalez.  

He credits his professors for increasing his passion by pushing him in the right direction.  

Professor Marinel Cruz taught him to believe in himself by showing him that he’s a good singer.  

“She’s absolutely phenomenal….she challenges me to be a better musician," he said.  

Professors John Mendelly,  Vincent Connor and Beverly Coulter pushed him to discover the different areas of his voice. 

“Dr. Coulter pushes me to do everything music majors have to do even though I’m only minoring,” he said. “Sometimes people make you feel like you’re less than but she saw potential and told me I could….I really appreciate her for that,” he said.  

Gonzalez has also been inspired by others such as American composer, playwright and lyricist, Lin-Manuel Miranda who created “In the Heights," a musical about a young storeowner who experiences the highs and lows of his Latin community in Washington Heights. 

“I look up to how he shapes his career because of the way he depicted the idea of Latino community as normal people instead of gangsters as society portrays…he wrote a show where he could be himself,” said Gonzalez.  

With creative writing as an interest since high school, Gonzalez hopes to be able to create roles for those who feel like there are no roles for them, just as Miranda did.  

Gonzalez’s love for writing helps stir his creativity while music allows him to understand how a singer’s voice works, and acting helps him read scripts, which are all elements used when creating a piece. 

 The screenwriting course taught by Dr. Andrea Greenbaum allowed him to explore his creative side by inventing his own movie musical.  

The musical is about a girl with a social anxiety disorder -selective muteness- who struggles to find her voice in a family of singers and society. Her professors and friends help her overcome her anxiety to do what she loves, singing. This movie musical is meant to represent a modern Little Mermaid where instead of losing her voice for a man like Ariel, the protagonist loses it in fear that something will get in the way of her dreams.  

“When Jonathan was just a freshman, and was only an English major at the time, he was the most dedicated vocal performer!” said Isis Ferreira, another vocal performance senior. 

Using his interest in fairy tales, Gonzalez created this story line to reveal how anxiety is like an impulse because of its irrationality. Music is the only thing that feels rational and natural to her. 

“Jonathan’s love for music is so obvious that there is not a single moment where he is not singing or jamming out to whatever song is playing in his head,” said Amanda Lund, a senior majoring in vocal performance. 

Since matriculating at Barry, he has performed in 15 productions. 

In the play Metamorphoses that took place Oct. 11-14, he played Apollo, Vertumnus, the Narrator and Sailor. As Apollo - the god of music - he sung “The Beautiful Light," a part that Coulter thought perfectly fit his voice.  

Gonzalez was recently featured in the “Bernstein and the Big Band” musical production honoring Leonard Bernstein’s 100th birthday on Nov. 17 in the Broad Auditorium. In it, he played Toni in “West Side Story” and sung the “One Hand One Heart" duet and “I am Easily Assimilated” in the Candid Opera.  

“It’s cool how my classes merge…we read Candid in my World Literary Masterpieces class….everything I chose to study marries seamlessly…that’s the awesome thing about a liberal arts education, you get to dip your toe in what you like,” he said. 

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